Skydiving is the Ultimate Thrill For the Brave

Skydiving is the Ultimate Thrill For the Brave

Each and every year, hundreds of thousands of people decide to take the plunge out of a speeding aircraft.  Those brave souls risk falling to the earth in order to experience the thrill of free falling and soaring through the air.  Before you’re allowed to jump, you need proper training and certification.  This ensures the maximum safety and will help you get back to the ground in one piece.  Many places all over America offer training and jumps for a fee.  Here’s what you should expect once you locate a spot near you.

Make sure you call way ahead of time in order to make reservations.  The last thing you want to do is show up expecting to jump only to find that they’re too busy.  Once you’re set up, you’ll want to get yourself prepared for jump day.  The morning of your jump, you should always eat a light breakfast or lunch that isn’t overly greasy.  You might feel a bit anxious and that’s only going to get worse if you show up on an empty stomach.  Avoid things like fast food or fried foods prior to your jump.  Wear light clothing that you’re comfortable in.  Chances are you’ll be putting on something over your clothes, so don’t be too concerned with what you look like.  Lastly, make sure that you show up on time and don’t be late!  Instructors get annoyed when people show up late and you can sometimes lose your reservation or deposit.

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Nearly all first timers are going to be experiencing a tandem jump.  This means that you’re going to be tethered to an experienced jumper that will be responsible for tracking altitude and wearing and controlling the parachute.  On a jump like this, you typically just strap in and enjoy the ride.  There isn’t much else required of you.  You’ll quickly reach terminal velocity and head straight for the earth at approximately 120 miles per hour.  Jumpers typically hop out at around 12,500 to 14,000 feet and deploy the parachute at around 3000 feet.  Once fully inflated, the open parachute can be steered toward the drop zone.  During a tandem jump, the experienced jumper will typically control the parachute.  People will usually jump alone after some advance training and experiencing a couple of tandem jumps.

If you’re seeking a thrill that is hard to beat, maybe it’s time to face your fears and go skydiving.